Is a Vasectomy Right for Me?

Vasectomy has no effect on a man’s sex drive, testosterone levels, erections, orgasms, or how much semen he ejaculates.  Now that we have that question out of the way, men typically have a lot of other questions regarding the advantages and disadvantages of vasectomy versus other forms of contraception. Here are the main ones.

Will a vasectomy affect my masculinity or my ability to have an orgasm?

Vasectomy has no effect on a man’s sex drive, testosterone levels, erections, orgasms, or how much semen he ejaculates. Many men who have undergone the procedure, and their partners, find that sex is more spontaneous and enjoyable because they no longer have the inconvenience or concerns about contraceptives such as condoms or a diaphragm. They also don’t have to worry about an accidental pregnancy.

What are the advantages of having a vasectomy?

Convenience. Once you’ve had a vasectomy, you’re free from the hassle and worry of contraception and possible pregnancy. Many men who have undergone the procedure, and their partners, find that sex is more spontaneous and enjoyable because they no longer have to worry about contraceptives such as condoms or a diaphragm. They also don’t have to worry about an accidental pregnancy.

Cost. Vasectomy is a one-time, relatively inexpensive procedure that’s often covered by insurance or state grant programs.

Reliability. Vasectomy is more dependable than any other form of contraception.

Will a vasectomy protect me from STDs?

Although vasectomy is extremely effective for preventing pregnancy, it doesn’t offer protection against AIDS or other sexually transmitted diseases. This is why it’s important that vasectomized men continue to use condoms, preferably latex, which offer considerable protection against the spread of disease, in any sexual encounter that carries the risk of contracting or transmitting infection.

What if I change my mind and want children?

Sometimes a man’s situation changes and fathering a child becomes a priority rather than something to avoid. Reversing a vasectomy is possible, but it’s a more difficult and expensive operation than vasectomy, with no guarantee of success. And although it’s possible to for a man to store semen in a sperm bank to preserve the possibility of pregnancy at as future date, semen storage is costly. In addition, the sperm in stored semen don’t always remain healthy and able to cause pregnancy.  For this reason, doctors advise that vasectomy be undertaken only by men who accept that they will no longer be able to father a child. Men who are in a serious relationship should discuss vasectomy with their partners.

Is a vasectomy a safe medical procedure?

Vasectomy has a low risk of side effects and complications. Also, vasectomy poses less of a medical risk than female sterilization and it eliminates risks to the female partner related to oral contraceptives or IUDs. Vasectomy is also easier to reverse than female sterilization.

Any medical procedure, no matter how minor, carries a degree of risk. No-scalpel vasectomy is no different, though the risks are quite low and are lower than conventional vasectomy. Here are the complications that are possible:

  • bleeding or bruising (typically minor)
  • infection
  • vasectomy failure (very rare, but it’s possible for sperm to cross the void between the two blocked ends of the vas deferens)
  • sperm granuloma (a hard, pea-sized lump that results from sperm leaking from the cut end of the vas deferens; these are not harmful and typically disappear over time)
  • congestion (a sense of fullness or pressure in the scrotum, which typically resolves over time)